Microsoft compiler now has a secret code. Is it a necessity or just a whim?

secret code
Microsoft decided to put an early code for its “compiler-as-a-service“. The project was created for Visual Basic and C#, the code lets programmers hook into the application building process.

Code, named Roslyn, the program included Microsoft full rewriting the earlier compilers for VBA and C#, starting from C++ to common Visual Basic and well-known C#, at the same time.

The process of preparing code on Microsoft’s operation platform and the conversion of source data into mechanic code has always been an isolated process that should take place inside the boxed-off compiler.

But now can Roslyn uncover this process of conversion, thereby it becomes transparent for  the developers outside Microsoft. They are able to see what’s going on – and create other better tools for IT development in different languages in refactoring area and deep visualization space.

Some thoughts of S. Somasegar, corporate vice-president of developer division:

The main idea of Roslyn compilers get services opened for general consumption, all that internal lets the compiler make developed knowledge available for all programmers and their tools shown. Such stages of the compiler as a stage for parsing, for working out semantic analysis, for creating and for IL emitting from now on are all uncovered to developers through rich managed APIs.

We didn’t here a word from Microsoft on account of Roselyn’s availability, although Somasegar noted, that Roslyn is “focused towards a post-Visual Studio 11 release“.

The programmer preview for Visual Studio 11 – which will be called expectedly Visual Studio 2012 – was shared at Microsoft’s Build conference, which took place last month. The software suite is expected to make its first steps next year.

Such a CTP [Community Technology Preview] will be helpful for the illumination of different kinds of smart end-to-end experiences that will become possible with such a saucy technology,” Somasegar said.

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