How to use a natural language like a code?

Today we suggest you to think a bit about following topic. Perhaps, everyone knows that sometimes we need to keep information in a secret. Maybe being a child, you were playing in war and it was necessary to share secret data with yours friends. Possibly, nowadays you want to send your letters, for example, and be sure nobody will able to read them. You’re right, today our theme is about data encryption.

For keeping your data in a secret, you can use encryption. In this case, you may hope that your message will be read by necessary person. However, there is possibility somebody else will be able to get your secret data and decode them. How to deal with it? Yes, you can make a tricky code with appropriate key length and difficult algorithm, but even the complicated structure can be broken. Nevertheless, specialists in encryption say about using a natural language as a code and it’s not a myth.

The main idea of using a natural language as a code is that you may take an uncommon language and deal with it or build your cryptographic system on the base of this one. For instance, during the World War II American military forces used as a code the Navajo, the language of Indians living in the USA. Historians point out the fact that the Navajo was the only code that Japanese could not break during the WWII. It was used as secure radio communication and the Japanese militaries couldn’t manage to decode all the secret messages that were sent in this way.

Now we know the Navajo has really a complex grammar and there is no written form. The second problem to learn this language is that there are very few Navajo native speakers. As a result, it was very difficult for Japanese to crack this cryptographic system. However, nowadays you should be careful if you want to use a natural language as a code. This means can only slow down an attack before your code will be broken. In addition, specialists in encryption advise to use complex methods of protection.

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